Entertainment

Yara Shahidi Lands ‘Teen Vogue’ Cover With BFF Rowan Blanchard

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yara-rowan-teen-vogueYoung stars, budding activists, and real-life best friends Yara Shahidi and Girl Meets World star Rowan Blanchard are front and center on December’s Teen Vogue cover.

Yara, 16, and Rowan, 15, not only grace the cover, but also serve as the issue’s guest editors. The cover’s headline, “Smart Girls Speak Up!” gives you a good idea of where these two young ladies’ heads are at (HINT: firmly on their shoulders). The girls’ accompanying cover story was co-written by them and they touched on sweet topics like what they thing about each other, serious topics like their activism (they’re both very outspoken on topics like gender equality and racial inequality)- and everything in-between.

Yara and Rowan recently did an American Eagle campaign together and have been close friends for years. In Teen Vogue, Yara describes why she values Rowan as a friend and person, saying that the GMW star “emits beams of light and happiness onto other people.” “Her work, her heartfelt humanitarianism, her art, and her friendships all blossom from a belief that everybody should be allowed to be and live in their truest form, without pressure or recrimination,” Yara wrote. “She is the friend I talk to when I need to process the fragile state of our world, or when I am craving new music or a film to fill my spirit.”

The Black-ish star also opened up about what inspired her activism, part of which she credits the series for. “For me, just by being on a show called Black-ish, race became an unavoidable conversation. It gave me this platform to address these topics, and that opened the doors to develop my voice in an intentional way. On a personal level, even though I was always hyper aware of our history, I didn’t put race in a real physical context until I hit my teens,” she wrote.

“For me, just by being on a show called @blackishabc, race became an unavoidable conversation. It gave me this platform to address these topics, and that opened the doors to develop my voice in an intentional way. On a personal level, even though I was always hyperaware of our history, I didn’t put race in a real physical context until I hit my teens. Being mixed—I’m half Iranian and half black—even has its strange amalgamation of problems. The first instance that really rubbed me the wrong way was when somebody called me whitewashed. I couldn’t process what that meant. In theory, I’d heard all the stereotypes. But it was my first time seeing, Oh, wow, people still believe in a black stereotype. What was conflicting was that I was surrounded by successful women and people of color who were—by society’s view—the anomaly. All around me, there were examples of excellence and excelling. But because I carried myself a certain way, I wasn’t a “believable” black person to them. That was the strangest moment.”— @yarashahidi. 👑 Check out the link in bio to read Yara’s thought provoking interview with fellow visionary @rowanblanchard. 💕 📷: @seanthomas_photo

A photo posted by Teen Vogue (@teenvogue) on

Read the rest of what Yara and Rowan had to say in the December issue of Teen Vogue, which heads to newsstands November 15th.

Photo Credit: Teen Vogue/Twitter